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Linguistic inclusion on the internet

Linguistic inclusion on the internet

By AlokeThakore

Not a single one of the Eighth Schedule Indian languages is used by more...

Net neutrality: Superhighway to digital inclusion

Net neutrality: Superhighway to digital inclusion

By Ashoak Upadhyay

If users have to pay for the services available via the internet unde...

Ambivalent internet: Freedoms and fears

Ambivalent internet: Freedoms and fears

By Shivani Gupta

The internet is not a gender-neutral space. Women from patriarchal backg...

Digital inequality in the Global South

Digital inequality in the Global South

By TT Sreekumar

Studies which focus on information and communication technologies (ICTs)...

Caste concerns in landmark e-governance projects

Caste concerns in landmark e-governance projects

By Rahul De’

Many e-governance programmes in developing countries reach into the furthes...

Public health

Backgrounders

Health : Background & Perspective

By Sandhya Srinivasan

India has made rapid strides in the health sector since Independence: life expectancy has gone up markedly, the infant mortality rate has been halved, 42 per cent of children receive the essential immunisations. We have a huge private healthcare infrastructure. And yet, critical health issues remain: infectious diseases continue to claim a large number of lives, babies continue to die needless deaths from diarrhoea and respiratory infections, and millions still do not have access to the most basic healthcare.



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Analysis

The need to cut pharma super-profits

By Sandhya Srinivasan

Pharmaceuticals pricing policy 2011

The draft National Pharmaceuticals Pricing Policy 2011 brings 348 essential drugs under price control, but what about non-essential drugs, which are the bulk of those sold and which can be priced several times higher than their manufacturing cost, asks S Srinivasan

Cancer can kill. Treating cancer can bankrupt. This is also true of malaria, tuberculosis, diabetes... If the high cost of healthcare can force poor and even middle class Indians to sell assets to pay for medical expenses, the bulk of these expenses is for medicines.
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Related Articles

»The larger implications of the Novartis Glivec judgment  By Sudip Chaudhuri
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»The cost of drugs: beyond the Supreme Court order  By Sanjay Nagral
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»Compensation for injury in drug trials in India By Sandhya Srinivasan
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Features

Waves of change in rural health

By Usha Rai

ALERT (Active for Literacy and Environmental Renovation Task)A communications initiative that has spread awareness of healthcare needs and entitlements in hundreds of villages across Gujarat and Rajasthan has had a huge impact

It was late at night when the mukhiya of Naal village in Gogunda block, Udaipur district, Rajasthan, called the medical emergency helpline 108 for an ambulance to take a pregnant woman to the nearest community health centre for delivery. The ambulance could only reach the next morning at 5 am, he was told curtly.

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Related Articles

»Mobile friends for healthy mothers By Anindita Sengupta
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»Social inequities in cancer ward By Freny Manecksha
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»Hooked on disease By Manipadma Jena
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Books & Reports

Mothers tell the malnutrition story

By Pamela Philipose

malnutrition hunger nutrition of children

The hunger and malnutrition (HUNGaMA) survey underlines the close links between a mother’s physical and educational status and her child’s nutritional status. In the six best-performing rural districts roughly 95% of mothers had been to school, whereas in the worst-performing districts 66.3% of mothers had never been to school

The Hunger and Malnutrition (HUNGaMA) Survey Report 2011 has revealed that 42% of Indian children were malnourished and 59% were stunted – the prevalence of stunting increasing sharply from birth through the first two years of a child’s life.

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Related Articles

»Every man's doctor By Neeta Deshpande
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»Painful facts By Binita Sen
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»47% of children in India are underweight: Unicef
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Changemakers

Bimla Devi: Health messages and hymns

By Alka Arya

Bimla Devi, a young dalit woman from Nagal Teju village in Haryana, has managed to ensure safe motherhood and deliveries in her village. She has got the upper and lower castes drinking water from the same tap. She has prevented a child marriage. And she has spread awareness about gender equality and panchayati raj.

Every afternoon in Nagal Teju village in Rewari District in Haryana, a group of about 20 young women get together and sit and chant the name of god. No, they do not belong to any religious sect and nor are they part of a music troupe.

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Related Articles

»BODHI: Contuining medical education for healthcare workers
By Sandhya Srinivasan
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»What to do with our waste: the Sulabh solution By Lalitha Sridhar
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»Drs Nandakumar and Shylaja Menon: Coming home By Mari Marcel Thekaekara
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Stories of change

Trust built on vision

By Frederick Noronha

The Aravind eyecare organisation, which does 1,000 surgeries and 6,000 consultations every day, was inspired by the MacDonald’s model of efficiency and affordability

After coping with myopia (near-sightedness) from the age of 7, I grew more than a little careless because my eyes didn’t seem to be getting any worse after years of heavy computer use. In my 40s, however, I needed an additional pair of reading glasses. .

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Related Articles

»Holistic healing through rural herbal traditions By Monideepa Sahu
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»Reconstructing hope By Monideepa Sahu
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»Helpline for artists
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News

Govt notifies stronger pictorial warnings on tobacco packs

With over 2,000 people in India said to be dying every day from tobacco-related diseases, the government’s notification for more graphic pictorial health warnings on tobacco product packs from December 1, 2011, is long overdue.

The Indian government has finally decided to make graphic pictorial warnings on cigarette packs mandatory from December 1, 2011. The existing warnings of a scorpion on bidi packs and a cancer-affected lung on tobacco product packs will be replaced by graphic pictures of oral and lung cancers.

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Related Articles

»Antibiotic resistance reaching critical levels, warning for India: WHO
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»Delhi High Court orders crackdown on illegal tobacco outlets
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»Indian Supreme Court rules on the right to die
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Statistics

Source of health care

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Tobacco use by women and men

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Prevalence of tuberculosis by type of housing and fuel/cooking arrangements

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Healthcare markets and you

Pirates of traditional knowledge

By Sandhya Srinivasan

If a draft protocol on access and benefit-sharing of genetic resources is adopted in Japan in October, there will finally be an international law to prevent corporations from commandeering biological resources and traditional knowledge for their own profit, without sharing it with the community that holds the knowledge

In July 2010, the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group on Access and Benefit-sharing, with  representatives of governments, industry and community organisations, will meet in Montreal, Canada.

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Related Articles

»The Wild West of stem cell procedures By Sandhya Srinivasan
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»The corrupt doctor By Sandhya Srinivasan
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»A vaccine for every ailment  By Sandhya Srinivasan
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By Sandhya Srinivasan

India has made rapid strides in the health sector since Independence: life expectancy has gone up markedly, the infant mortality rate has been halved, 42 per cent of children receive the essential immunisations. We have a huge private healthcare infrastructure. And yet, critical health issues remain: infectious diseases continue to claim a large number of lives, babies continue to die needless deaths from diarrhoea and respiratory infections, and millions still do not have access to the most basic healthcare.

Read more...

Can the new rules deliver justice, asks Sandhya Srinivasan

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By Sudip Chaudhuri

The Supreme Court judgment on the Novartis-Glivec case has gone beyond technical and legal issues and linked the question of patenting with net benefits to society. What the judgment says and what it implies has significance for patent regimes in developing countries

 

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By Sanjay Nagral

The Supreme Court decision denying Novartis a patent for the cancer drug imanitib has been hailed as a victory for the affordable medicines movement. But it won’t make much difference if doctors continue to prescribe expensive branded drugs, patients believe that only expensive drugs work, and the government does little to support the manufacture of affordable medicines

The cost of drugs

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The draft National Pharmaceuticals Pricing Policy 2011 brings 348 essential drugs under price control, but what about non-essential drugs, which are the bulk of those sold and which can be priced several times higher than their manufacturing cost, asks S Srinivasan

Pharmaceuticals pricing policy 2011

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By Jacob Puliyel

The new National Vaccine Policy Draft 2011openly favours industry. It provides for advance market commitments for new vaccines, whereby government guarantees a market for the vaccine before it is tested and even if it is not efficacious. Should our vaccine policy focus on the health of our children, or the viability of the vaccine industry?

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As drug companies flock to India to conduct drug trials on the cheap, they capitalise on a combination of money-hungry researchers, a vulnerable population and a lax regulatory system. This is fertile ground for ethical violations that threaten the health and rights of poor Indians.  Read Ankur Paliwal’s article in Down To Earth

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Binayak Sen comments on the WHO’s report on the social determinants of health, and illustrates how an inequitable system keeps large sections of Indians walking with famine by their side

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India is a global exporter of vaccines but 50% of our children under one are not completely immunised. The government has ordered the reopening of vaccine-manufacturing PSUs, but a strategic plan on consistently meeting India's basic vaccine needs is still not clear. Venkat Srinivasan tells the story of India’s vaccine production programme, a story of politics, dishonesty and misguided priorities

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The government’s move to scale up and subsidise community health insurance schemes while doing nothing to improve healthcare service delivery is a flawed strategy. It’s like getting PDS shops to distribute mango kernels and mahua seeds as drought relief instead of foodgrains since the poor survive on these anyway, says Oommen C Kurian

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

In a country where 26% of participants are enrolling for clinical trials just so that they get free or quality healthcare, it is dangerous to allow contract research organisations easy access to patient databases and to offer medicos payment for recruiting patients in trials, says Sandhya Srinivasan

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Our panicky leaders have adopted the very strategy that the WHO warned against in dealing with the H1N1 outbreak, says leading virologist Dr T Jacob John, pointing out in this exclusive article for Infochange how government should have handled the pandemic

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The media and the government health services have unwittingly collaborated to create and escalate public alarm over the H1N1 influenza outbreak in India. Sandhya Srinivasan points out what their response to this public health crisis should have been

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

The swine flu pandemic is relatively mild in India so far, but in India and elsewhere what governments must do to prevent the occurrence of such outbreaks is strengthen public health systems, regulate corporate livestock farming, and ensure access to essential drugs and vaccines

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The recent changes in the Indian government’s drug policy for the treatment of the deadly falciparum malaria are illogical and harmful. Sandhya Srinivasan analyses the short-sighted response to this public health crisis

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By Dr Siddharth Agarwal

India marked World Malaria Day (April 25) with over 1 million cases of the disease in 2008, half of them of the dangerous P falciparum strain. Since this is largely due to unplanned urban growth and the growing number of urban poor, urban planning that is done keeping community needs in mind would go a long way in checking the spread of malaria

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

A startling new study that surveyed 700,000 people in Raigad and Mumbai suggests that the burden of leprosy could be three to nine times the official figures. Obviously, people are not being detected and treated in time. Are the misguided policies of the National Leprosy Elimination Programme leading to a public health failure?

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By Ranjita Biswas

Despite launching the largest ever mass immunisation campaign against polio in February 2003, targeting 165 million children, the battle against polio has not been won. To understand the causes of the repeated occurrence, we need to understand the profile of the wild polio virus

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

When India passed the Transplantation of Human Organs Act banning trade in organs, those who had agitated for the law may have thought they had won the battle. Instead the kidney trade has only flourished. The public is being told that the only way to put a stop to the kidney trade by people such as Amit Kumar, who has been running a global trade in organs since 1994, is to regulate the market for human organs

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By Ramesh Venkataraman

Following the NFHS survey, the HIV numbers game has begun again. The point is that regardless of the actual number of people infected in India, there can be no complacency or drop in political and societal commitment towards HIV intervention and the rights of positive people

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By George Thomas

Binayak Sen, who was arrested in Chhattisgarh in May, is one of very few medical practitioners in India who see their role as not just saving individual lives but examining and highlighting the social context of disease. Is it just to arrest a doctor who is acting according to his conscience?

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By Neha Madhiwalla

As the tussle between proponents of sex education in schools and conservatives who wish to ban it continues, Neha Madhiwalla writes that the evidence of the benefits of sex education is not very convincing

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By Darryl D'Monte

With growing calls for the reintroduction of DDT to fight the resurgence of malaria worldwide, we must not forget the reasons why many countries have banned this toxic substance and other dangerous chemicals that cause cancers and other persistent diseases that impair health and possibly prove fatal

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By Rashme Sehgal

Denis Broun, country representative of UNAIDS, defends a recently-published report by his organisation that states that over 4 lakh AIDS-related deaths occurred in India in 2005 -- the highest in the world

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By Rashme Sehgal

Public health specialist Dr Ritu Priya critiques government policy on bird flu, as well as HIV/AIDS, polio and tuberculosis

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

The outbreak of bird flu in Nandurbar district, Maharashtra, is particularly worrisome for a country like India, which has a weak public health system and an annual per capita public health expenditure of just Rs 200

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By Rakesh Shukla

The medical profession has consistently resisted the jurisdiction of the courts. A recent Supreme Court judgment puts medical professionals in India above the criminal law of the land. But surely it is hazardous to start carving out exceptions to the uniform applicability of criminal law, asks Supreme Court advocate Rakesh Shukla

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By Anant Phadke

The Crocin you buy from your local drugstore at 80-90 paise per tablet costs just 15 paise to make. Dr Anant Phadke delves into the various forms of profiteering in the pharmaceutical sector and suggests ways to oppose it

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By M Prasanna Kumar

The figure for HIV prevalence in India for 2004 looks encouraging -- an increase of only 28,000. But how has this figure been arrived at? And how accurate is it?

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

There are 5 million HIV-positive people in India today. But there is a slight drop in the rate of growth of HIV infection, and the overall prevalence remains below 1%. An overview of HIV/AIDS in India

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By T K Rajalakshmi

In December 2003, the Indian government declared a strong policy-cum-programme commitment to provide free ARV treatment to 100,000 AIDS patients. But important issues related to the creation of a conducive atmosphere for AIDS patients, confidentiality and the creation of a health infrastructure within the public health system have still to be addressed

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

What is the role of the health professional in a world torn apart by war and strife? This theme dominated discussions at the International Health Forum which preceded the World Social Forum in Mumbai

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By Maya Indira Ganesh

There has been a legitimate emergence of sexual minorities in India over the last decade. But even as transsexuals or sex workers exult in the opportunity to be heard and seen in mainstream society, we must realise that this is just one small evolutionary step towards raising the self-esteem of marginalised groups

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By Dr Mira Shiva And Dr Vandana Shiva

Rajasthan is a good case study of the links between international finance, ecological imbalance and health problems. The resurgence of malaria in this previously non-endemic area is the ecological and socio-economic consequence of the policies advocated by the Bretton Woods institutions

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

Protection of health personnel and patients from HIV transmission is difficult in a healthcare setting in which nurses may be permitted only two pairs of gloves a day and needles are reused after a perfunctory wash. The answer is not special precautions for HIV-positive patients, but universal precautions for all health workers who come into contact with blood and body fluids

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

What can the National AIDS Control Programme achieve in the absence of integration of HIV-related services into the health system as a whole? The second in a series assessing the HIV/AIDS situation in India

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By Chitra Ahanthem

In a state with the highest concentration of HIV/AIDS in India, interventions have focused on injecting drug users, neglecting their spouses, sexual partners and children

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By Usha Rai

A communications initiative that has spread awareness of healthcare needs and entitlements in hundreds of villages across Gujarat and Rajasthan has had a huge impact

ALERT (Active for Literacy and Environmental Renovation Task)

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By Anindita Sengupta

By providing antenatal care information to rural women through voice messages on their mobile phones, mMitra wants to change their beliefs and practices during pregnancy and post-partum

maternal mortality

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Text by Freny Manecksha
Photographs by Chirodeep Chaudhuri

Many poor cancer patients have no recourse but to make their way to the ‘open air ward’ outside Tata Memorial Hospital. An important new study suggests that delay in diagnosis and treatment may be responsible for the rate of cancer deaths in rural India matching urban India, and being twice as high in the least versus most educated segments

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By Manipadma Jena

With a Rs 6,750-crore fast food industry growing at 35% annually, non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders are rising sharply. How is this slow-motion health disaster to be tackled?

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By Saadia Azim

Scores of women living in inaccessible island villages across West Bengal’s South 24 Parganas district are finally able to access ante- and postnatal healthcare, and have institutional deliveries at community delivery centres and hospitals

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Minnie Vaid travels to Bagrumnala, a Khmar tribal village tucked away in the forests of Chhattisgarh, where Binayak Sen is a legend, and where he set up a remarkable model of rural healthcare, working with the community on everything from healthcare to nutrition and education

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By Rahul Goswami

The Indian government has been quick to rubbish the Lancet study on the NDM-1 bacterium, choosing to see this as a commercial problem that will impact our growing medical tourism industry, rather than as a healthcare problem that could seriously impact a country where antibiotics are overused and where scant attention is paid to infection control in hospitals

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By B Jayashree

Cervical cancer affects millions in India. It can be effectively treated if diagnosed early. Now, the VIA/VILI kit, which costs only Rs 5 and can be used by any healthcare professional, is being introduced across Tamil Nadu, offering women the possibility of early detection and treatment

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By Usha Rai

The government’s Janani Suraksha Yojana is pushing pregnant women towards institutional deliveries, but a study finds that the system is not ready to handle them. Women report terrible experiences at public health centres

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Text & Photographs by Chitrangada Choudhury

Though many migrant workers from south Madhya Pradesh have died of the incurable workplace disease called silicosis contracted from inhaling quartz dust in stone crushing factories in Gujarat, the public health system has carried out no comprehensive survey to identify the disease, which is often passed off as tuberculosis, many factories have not installed anti-pollution systems, and the NHRC has been sitting on the case since 2006

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By Deepanjali Bhas

Promoting something as simple as breastfeeding can reduce infant mortality by 11.6%. But though India has among the worst infant and child mortality figures in the world, 75% of the nation’s children are not breastfed from birth and over 50% are not exclusively breastfed.

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By Moushumi Basu

The fluoride level in water taken from a hand pump in Sidekhurd and other villages of Garwa district is more than twice the permissible level of 1 ppm. Acute dental and skeletal disorders plague these villagers, but they know nothing about fluorosis. Government admits that of the 550 fluoride control mechanisms installed, 100 are defunct

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By Anosh Malekar

The last time Pune saw a public health crisis like the present swine flu outbreak was the plague epidemic in 1897. As the city virtually shuts down, Pune’s haphazard growth, precarious infrastructure and complete unpreparedness for a crisis are exposed

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By Paramita Chaudhuri

India offers just one hospital bed nationally per 15,400 mentally ill patients. The situation in West Bengal is no different. A unique outsider art exhibition of dolls in Kolkata recently helped mentally handicapped individuals from two state-run institutions make dolls that communicate their lives and aspirations to each other and the outside world

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By Anosh Malekar

With the spotlight on lifestyle diseases like diabetes and hypertension, traditional illnesses like sickle cell disease, which affects tribals all across India, are not receiving the attention they deserve

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Rashme Sehgal visits a state-of-the-art sick and newborn care unit in the Guna district hospital in Madhya Pradesh. When set up across 50 districts in MP, this model is expected to reduce the infant mortality rate from 74 to 40 per 1,000

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By Usha Rai

A drop-in sexual-health centre in New Delhi and an adolescence sex education programme for class 10 students in rural and urban Haryana clearly demonstrate the benefits of sexuality education and counseling for youth

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By M Suchitra

A unique home-based palliative and chronic care movement is sweeping through Kerala. Thousands of trained citizens are volunteering two hours a week to take care of the chronically ill in villages and cities. Funding for this community-based scheme that has won WHO recognition comes in cash and kind from citizens, including schoolchildren, bus drivers, labourers and others

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By Anjali Deshpande

The Union Ministry of Health is examining the Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) Act with a view to raising the time limit for abortion from 20 weeks to 24 weeks. What would the moral and ethical implications of this move be? And why has the women’s movement in India been strangely silent on these important developments?

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With smoking in offices and private establishments banned from October 2, India is finally recognising that tobacco consumption is a major public health problem. But the ban by itself will not work. We need to reduce accessibility to all tobacco products, including gutkha, by taxing them out of reach and banning their sale in public places, says Deepanjali Bhas

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By Rashme Sehgal

After the furore over the direct nature of India's Adolescence Education Programme last year, NACO has come up with a sexuality education module that dare not mention 'intercourse' or 'safe sex' or even 'condoms'. Over 30 groups working with sexuality have rejected the material

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By Alok Prakash Putul

India passed the Leprosy Act in 1898 to ensure that leprosy patients did not face discrimination. A hundred years on, Indian laws and regulations do just that. Legislation in several states prevents leprosy patients from obtaining a driving licence, travelling in trains, and contesting panchayat elections. And many marriage laws make "contracting leprosy" grounds for divorce

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By Benita Sen

Cancer patient Roshanara's morphine tablets keep her relatively pain-free. Morphine is part of palliative care, which allows terminally ill patients to live a life of dignity, free of pain. Why, then, is it so scarce in India?

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By Aditi Rao

Over 4,000 people live in the Delhi leprosy complex. Though leprosy has been eliminated -- not eradicated -- in India, the stigma and discrimination that leprosy patients and their children face is far from eliminated, and it is only in colonies like this one that they can find companionship and a home

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By Sushmita Malaviya

Recent data from NFHS-III reveals that an overwhelming majority of Indians feel their children should be taught about sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS in school. Nevertheless, Uttar Pradesh, with the country's highest infant mortality rate and high maternal mortality and fertility rates, has chosen to ban its very successful Adolescent Education Programme in schools across the state

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By N P Chekkutty

Two reasons are attributed to the return of many epidemics to Kerala, a state that had achieved developed-country status in all the major human development indices: erosion of the grassroots-level public healthcare system that once thrived on government support, and dysfunctional municipal systems that do not deal effectively with waste-disposal

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By Bharathi Ghanashyam

Why is AIDS awareness so limited, despite 20 years of national and international efforts? Is it time to devise more creative and innovative measures, such as having one health worker in each primary health centre dedicated to spreading awareness on HIV/AIDS?

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By Rupa Chinai

In the first such major experiment of its kind in the country, the Manas project trains local people in Goa to deal with common mental health disorders, including depression, within the primary health setting

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By Andrea Cornwall

Brazil's innovative institutions offer inspiring lessons for engaging citizens in improving health for all

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By Rupa Chinai

Hafeeza Begum of Sipajhar is one of thousands of patients in Assam who are desperate to find a cure for tuberculosis but for whom the divide between availability of services and access to them is impossible to bridge

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By Darryl D'Monte

South Asia has 900 million people without sanitation. The problem, as the success of recent total-sanitation community projects have demonstrated, is not a lack of funds but a lack of conviction amongst people that they need sanitation, and that they can meet those needs themselves

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By N P Chekkutty

It is not by accident that the most violent clashes in Kerala in recent times have been the Muthanga adivasi struggle in Wayanad and the communal flare-ups in coastal Maradu. Kerala's famed model of development left the tribal-dominated hills and the coastal fisher communities socially, politically and economically marginalised, leaving the coast clear for communal forces to enter

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By Rupa Chinai

At the Rowmari state health dispensary in Bodoland, which caters to villages within an 8 km radius, there is no electricity, no anti-malarial drugs, no paper and pens even for birth and death certificates. The health facilities here are indicative of the state of all Bodo areas, which show shockingly high maternal and infant mortality rates

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By Bharathi Ghanashyam

Three years after a community health insurance scheme was implemented by the government of Karnataka and Karuna Trust, around 200,000 poor people have benefited, paying annual premiums of just Rs 30 per year for insurance cover of Rs 50 per day of hospitalisation

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

The stem cell therapy industry is booming in India, without regulation of any kind. Unorganised, unscientific 'research' is being passed off as therapy. Some of those offering stem cell therapy in India today may be preying on the desperation of seriously ill patients likely to agree to unknown risks

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

Dr Vasantha Muthuswamy, who helped draw up the guidelines for biomedical research in India, discusses the difficulties of ensuring that the trials being conducted in the country do not risk the lives of Indians

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

In the '70s and '80s, over 1,000 women with precancerous lesions of the cervix were left untreated, without their knowledge, to see how many developed cancer. In 1999, 25 patients of oral cancer were given an experimental drug without their knowledge or consent. How ethical are clinical trials in India?

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

Contract research organisations are aggressively marketing India's potential for cheap clinical trials to meet foreign drug regulatory needs. The government is actively promoting India as a site for clinical trials. This new fortnightly series points out why we should be concerned about this

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By Rupa Chinai

The Global Forum for Health Research held in Mumbai in September emphasised how health research that is linked to community response can help bridge the gap between policy and delivery of services

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By Freny Manecksha

Nine months ago, in one of India's least-developed districts, Malika was born, premature and underweight, with pneumonia, umbilical sepsis and hypothermia. This is the story of how she survived, thanks to the efforts of village health worker Gandhara Bhagde

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By Rahul Goswami

With only 407 doctors, inadequate sanitation and poor development indicators, Nagaland's people have limited access to quality healthcare. A report from the north-east

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Manipadma Jena

At a recent public hearing in Orissa's Jagatsinghpur district, both men and women told harrowing tales of negligence, bungling and lack of facilities in the state's public healthcare system

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By Freny Manecksha

Ankur, a home-based neo-natal care programme based on the acclaimed SEARCH model, is operative in 11 villages of Osmanabad district in Maharashtra. The programme is making a tangible difference to the health of infants and mothers. Freny Manecksha goes on night calls through the twisting lanes of Chauhanwadi with two village health workers

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By Naren Karunakaran

In caste-ridden Bihar, in the village of Math-chilaven, it is the Brahmins who are discriminated against by the powerful Yadavs. The Brahmins of Math-chilaven, a village that is entirely cut off during the monsoon months, do not even have a voice in the elections

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By Dr Sudhirendar Sharma

The issue of contaminated soft drinks seems to have been pushed on to the backburner with the Pesticide Residues Sub-Committee deciding to set up yet another committee to monitor soft drinks for a year before any attempts are made to decide standards for pesticide contamination

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By Rashme Sehgal

Uttar Pradesh has a maternal mortality rate of 707 per 100,000. Activists believe that the poor quality of reproductive health services offered by state primary health centres, and the continuing target-based approach to family planning are responsible for this. Our correspondent discovered a trail of botched sterilisations, unsafe abortions, antiquated surgical techniques and hasty cover-ups

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By Rashme Sehgal

Forty thousand women die every year of childbirth and related complications in Uttar Pradesh, which has the highest maternal mortality rate in the world. Now, a tussle over where to buy dai kits has stalled their distribution to village midwives, putting more lives at risk

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By Sreelatha Menon

At Usayini in Uttar Pradesh, some 'health camps' funded by USAIDS are really places where local midwives are pushed to bring women in for sterilisation. There is absolutely no attempt to provide all-round reproductive health care. This approach flies in the face of India's official policy of target-free family planning

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By Lalitha Sridhar

The Banyan model of care for the mentally ill incorporates support, vocational training, rehabilitation and permanent care. NIMHANS, the nodal institution for mental health in India, recommends that the 10-year-old and very successful Banyan model be replicated in other parts of the state

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By Elisa Patnaik

Orissa has the highest infant mortality rate in the country at 97 per 1,000 live births. Approximately 86,000 infants die in the state each year. Poor healthcare facilities for mother and child, malnutrition, malaria and lack of awareness are major contributing factors. Can the state reduce IMR to the targeted 60/1,000 by 2005?

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

Do we have 2 million or 20 million HIV-positive in India? Or is there a plateuing of the epidemic? Speculative and alarmist figures about the number of Indians affected by HIV/AIDS have added to public confusion and affected the programme's credibility. This is the first in a series of articles on the issues and controversies surrounding HIV in India

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By Chittaranjan Andrade

Presenting two sides of an ongoing public health debate

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Exploring the lives of the mentally ill in India

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By Sena Desai

A year ago, Unicef's vitamin A campaign in Assam caused the death of 30 children and sent over 1,000 to hospital with vitamin A toxicity. The larger question is whether such mass campaigns to combat malnutrition-related deficiencies in India are still required. Or do we need a more sustainable approach?

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The World Bank's Handwashing Initiative is based on the conviction that the simple practice of washing hands with soap could reduce deaths from diarrhoea by half. But its intentions are being questioned in Kerala, where people say they need safe drinking water, not multinational soap

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By Huned Contractor

An estimated 5,000 tribal children died of malnutrition in Melghat, Maharashtra, between 1992-97. Since 1997, a group of volunteers has been working with the Korkus in this remote forest region, helping educate them about nutrition, sanitation and preventive health care

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By Pamela Bhagat

In the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, where no family planning campaign has ever penetrated, it is the Naun or barber's wife who accompanies child brides to their husbands' homes at puberty and advises them on family planning and family welfare. This traditional practice does not seem likely to change in the foreseeable future

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By Jaya Jose

In 1995, the Foundation for Research in Community Health began training semi-literate village women to diagnose and treat common health disorders. Today, Parinche's tais are not just barefoot healthworkers. They're also scripting an ecological, cultural and educational revolution in their villages

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By Sandhya Srinivasan

Tuberculosis in developing countries is not just a disease requiring effective medical treatment. It is a disease complicated by complex socio-economic problems such as unemployment, poverty and malnourishment. The story of tuberculosis in India is the story of people with no right to food, employment, shelter or healthcare. No wonder the figures for TB haven't changed all that much in the last few years

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By Keya Acharya

Health experts warn that mental health problems are increasing sharply worldwide. According to the World Health Organisation, depression is set to become the main cause of disability and the second leading health problem by the year 2020. In developing countries, inequality, poverty and gender are significant factors contributing to mental illness

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Following the recent announcement that the National Human Rights Commission will now coordinate governmental and non-governmental measures to help the widows of Vrindavan and the rest of the country, this article discusses the situation and problems of widows in India, past and present

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By Pamela Philipose

The hunger and malnutrition (HUNGaMA) survey underlines the close links between a mother’s physical and educational status and her child’s nutritional status. In the six best-performing rural districts roughly 95% of mothers had been to school, whereas in the worst-performing districts 66.3% of mothers had never been to school

malnutrition hunger nutrition of children

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By Neeta Deshpande

Throughout his career in reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation for the leprosy-afflicted and in building community healthcare models, Dr Noshir Antia worked to take healthcare to the grassroots, realising that the fundamental cause of disease is poverty

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By Benita Sen

Over 7 million people in India suffer avoidable pain simply because they have no access to morphine, says a Human Rights Watch report on India’s obligation to ensure palliative care

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Over half the world's underweight children live in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, says a new Unicef report on the global progress on children's issues. About 5.6 million children worldwide die every year for lack of adequate nutrients

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