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Public health

Mon10162017

Last updateSat, 22 Jul 2017 6am

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Public Health

Analysis

The need to cut pharma super-profits

By Sandhya Srinivasan

Pharmaceuticals pricing policy 2011

The draft National Pharmaceuticals Pricing Policy 2011 brings 348 essential drugs under price control, but what about non-essential drugs, which are the bulk of those sold and which can be priced several times higher than their manufacturing cost, asks S Srinivasan

Cancer can kill. Treating cancer can bankrupt. This is also true of malaria, tuberculosis, diabetes... If the high cost of healthcare can force poor and even middle class Indians to sell assets to pay for medical expenses, the bulk of these expenses is for medicines.
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Features

Waves of change in rural health

By Usha Rai

ALERT (Active for Literacy and Environmental Renovation Task)A communications initiative that has spread awareness of healthcare needs and entitlements in hundreds of villages across Gujarat and Rajasthan has had a huge impact

It was late at night when the mukhiya of Naal village in Gogunda block, Udaipur district, Rajasthan, called the medical emergency helpline 108 for an ambulance to take a pregnant woman to the nearest community health centre for delivery. The ambulance could only reach the next morning at 5 am, he was told curtly.

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Books & Reports

Mothers tell the malnutrition story

By Pamela Philipose

malnutrition hunger nutrition of children

The hunger and malnutrition (HUNGaMA) survey underlines the close links between a mother’s physical and educational status and her child’s nutritional status. In the six best-performing rural districts roughly 95% of mothers had been to school, whereas in the worst-performing districts 66.3% of mothers had never been to school

The Hunger and Malnutrition (HUNGaMA) Survey Report 2011 has revealed that 42% of Indian children were malnourished and 59% were stunted – the prevalence of stunting increasing sharply from birth through the first two years of a child’s life.

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»47% of children in India are underweight: Unicef
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News

Govt notifies stronger pictorial warnings on tobacco packs

With over 2,000 people in India said to be dying every day from tobacco-related diseases, the government’s notification for more graphic pictorial health warnings on tobacco product packs from December 1, 2011, is long overdue.

The Indian government has finally decided to make graphic pictorial warnings on cigarette packs mandatory from December 1, 2011. The existing warnings of a scorpion on bidi packs and a cancer-affected lung on tobacco product packs will be replaced by graphic pictures of oral and lung cancers.

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Stories of change

Trust built on vision

By Frederick Noronha

The Aravind eyecare organisation, which does 1,000 surgeries and 6,000 consultations every day, was inspired by the MacDonald’s model of efficiency and affordability

After coping with myopia (near-sightedness) from the age of 7, I grew more than a little careless because my eyes didn’t seem to be getting any worse after years of heavy computer use. In my 40s, however, I needed an additional pair of reading glasses. .

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»Holistic healing through rural herbal traditions By Monideepa Sahu
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»Reconstructing hope By Monideepa Sahu
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»Helpline for artists
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Statistics

Source of health care

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Tobacco use by women and men

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Prevalence of tuberculosis by type of housing and fuel/cooking arrangements

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Changemakers

Bimla Devi: Health messages and hymns

By Alka Arya

Bimla Devi, a young dalit woman from Nagal Teju village in Haryana, has managed to ensure safe motherhood and deliveries in her village. She has got the upper and lower castes drinking water from the same tap. She has prevented a child marriage. And she has spread awareness about gender equality and panchayati raj.

Every afternoon in Nagal Teju village in Rewari District in Haryana, a group of about 20 young women get together and sit and chant the name of god. No, they do not belong to any religious sect and nor are they part of a music troupe.

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Backgrounders

Health : Background & Perspective

By Sandhya Srinivasan

India has made rapid strides in the health sector since Independence: life expectancy has gone up markedly, the infant mortality rate has been halved, 42 per cent of children receive the essential immunisations. We have a huge private healthcare infrastructure. And yet, critical health issues remain: infectious diseases continue to claim a large number of lives, babies continue to die needless deaths from diarrhoea and respiratory infections, and millions still do not have access to the most basic healthcare.



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