Info Change India

Trade & development

Fri06232017

Last updateThu, 15 Jun 2017 11am

Font Size

Profile

Menu Style

Cpanel
You are here: Home | Special Sections | Trade and Development

Trade and Development

Backgrounders

A brief history of the WTO

By Prabhash Ranjan

WTO

The principle of non-discrimination was meant to be the cornerstone of the World Trade Organisation and the multilateral trading regime. But ten years down the line,it is clear that the trade rules favour developed countries, and the promise of greater market access for developing countries has not been sufficiently realised.


Read More

Related Articles

»The struggle for affordable medicines By Chan Park
Read More

»Can multilateral trade work for the poor? By Robin Koshy
Read More

»WTO negotiations and India's stand: Agriculture, NAMA and services By Abhijit Das
Read More

Analysis

Corporate profits or the right to life?

By Aakash Mehrotra

EU-India free trade agreement

The EU-India free trade agreement will wipe generic, cheap, unpatented drugs out of the market, writes Aakash Mehrotra

After four years of negotiations, finally the EU-India free trade agreement seems to be on the table. The pact is going to be a big ticket for business. Giving the Indian perspective, Rajgopal Sharma from the Indian embassy in Brussels said this Free Trade Agreement (FTA) “is the most ambitious agreement that India is hoping to enter into as compared to the earlier FTAs with other countries”.

Read More

Related Articles

»Farms or factories? By Darryl D'monte
Read More

»SEZs: Stirring up a storm along the Indian coast By Manshi Asher
Read More

»The Shenzhen Syndrome: Growth compromises equity By Aseem Shrivastava
Read More

Features

Inspiration from Burning Man

By Rajni Bakshi

decommodifyTake a break from your worries about the Indian economy and spare a moment for those who are worrying about civilisation itself, as at the Burning Man Festival

We are in the midst of a season of lament. As the rupee continues its sharp downward spiral a mood of gloom and doom has settled in. When pessimism strikes in this manner, it is imperative to step back and take a wide and long-range view of things.

Read More

Related Articles

»Barla’s battle of Nagri By Moushumi Basu
Read More

»Climate change is a depressing reality in Assam By Aditya Malaviya
Read More

»Token ombudsman? By Kanchi Kohli
Read More

Rethinking Nuclear Energy

Nuclear power: Myths, realities and FAQs

By Nityanand Jayaraman and G Sundar Rajan

Besides Koodankulam, local communities in Jaitapur, Maharashtra, and Gorakhpur, Haryana, are nixing nuclear power plants in their area. But government continues to maintain they are 100% safe, and that there is no alternative to nuclear energy. Nityanand Jayaraman and G Sundar Rajan dispel misconceptions about the safety of nuclear energy

Since August 2011, Tamil Nadu has witnessed renewed protests against the commissioning of the first of two 1,000 MW power plants as part of the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP).

Read More

Related Articles

»Why nuclear power is not our gateway to a prosperous future
Read More

»Twenty years of resistance at Koodankulam By Patibandla Srikant
Read More

»Nuclear disasters worldwide: 1952-2011
Read More

Politics of Diversity

No food security without ecological and livelihood security

By Ashish Kothari

Food Security Bill

Providing food for the poor is important, says Ashish Kothari, but the Food Security Bill must also create the conditions under which people can provide food for themselves, or have the means to buy it

The most interesting part of the National Food Security Bill 2011 is in an annex that is not operationalised by the Bill. Schedule III, which contains steps necessary to ensure the conditions under which food security can become a meaningful, long-term right of people, is relegated to the status of an intention.

Read More

Related Articles

»The future no one wants? By Ashish Kothari
Read More

»2012: A year for transformation? By Ashish Kothari
Read More

»Is sustainability truly built into the 12th 5-Year Plan? By Ashish Kothari
Read More

Eco-logic

Turning a blind eye to cell tower radiation risks

By Darryl D'Monte

cell tower radiationThe Maharashtra government has finally accepted that nearly half of Mumbai’s cell towers are illegal. However, the government is still not admitting the health risks posed by these towers

t long last, the Maharashtra government has reacted to the burgeoning menace of cell towers, which emit harmful radiation. The Minister of State for Urban Development Bhaskar Jadhav has announced that 1,830 cell towers out of 3,705 in the city – very nearly half -- do not have permission from the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and action will be initiated against the housing societies that gave the green signal for such installations.

Read More

Related Articles

»Acting globally and locally By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

»Softening the diesel blow By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

»From ‘Garibi Hatao’ to ‘Garib Hatao’ By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

Books & Reports

Putting people before economies

By Ranjan K Panda

Natural embankments Maplecroft studyNew research by Maplecroft discusses the economic cost of climate change and puts the focus on building flood defences and other infrastructural resilience. Surely the focus should be on rethinking big business’s destruction of local ecologies instead?

Even as Odisha and Andhra Pradesh continue to fight the aftermath of cyclonic storm Phailin, new research suggests that cyclones, floods, drought and other climate change-induced disasters will affect one-third of the world’s emerging economies, severely hampering them.

Read More

Related Articles

»Learning from China By Nitya Sambamurti Ghotge
Read More

»World fails to meet 2010 biodiversity target
Read More

»What it will take to build a sustainable culture By Anosh Malekar
Read More

Changemakers

Green warriors of the Garo hills

By Teresa Rehman

 Garo Students Union, and its dynamic leader Prosper S Marak

Meghalaya’s South Garo Hills are under serious threat from illegal coal mining. The Garo Students Union, and its dynamic leader Prosper S Marak, have been battling to preserve the biodiversity of this region. Marak was declared Earth Hero for 2009 and also won the Young Naturalist Award for 2009

In Meghalaya’s inaccessible South Garo Hills, an ‘eco-mutiny’ went virtually unnoticed.

Read More

Related Articles

»Tribal activist takes on steel giant By Moushumi Basu
Read More

»Satish Kumar: Walking the talk By Naveen Vasudevan
Read More

»Cleaning up the Ganga By Rashme Sehgal
Read More

Toxic Tours

Toxic Tours - XIX: Toxic Trespass

By Sharyle Patton

The right to bear a family and the right of all women to control all aspects of their health, particularly their own fertility, are being seriously compromised by exposure to toxic chemicals

Unlike our great-grandmothers - who lived out their lives before the chemical revolution began to unfold in the mid-1950s - we have taken in hundreds of toxic substances. Many take up residence in our body fat, where they may remain for decades; others are absorbed into the body and quickly metabolised and excreted.

Biomonitoring provides a snapshot of these body burdens and constitutes ultimate proof of our exposure. The data it provides have profound implications for women everywhere.

Read More

Related Articles

»Toxic Tours - XVIII: One man's gadget is another man's poison By Lisa Batiwalla
Read More

»Toxic Tours - XVII: White asbestos: Silent killer By Gopal Krishna
Read More

»Toxic Tours - XVI: The dirty dozen By Papiya Sarkar
Read More

Stories of Change

A rakhi for trees

By Moushumi Basu

Mahadev Mahato

The Taru Bandhan ritual being practised in the tribal heartland of Jharkhand has helped restore and conserve hundreds of acres of forestland in the state.

The tribal heartland of Jharkhand in eastern India has evolved a unique tradition of forest conservation -- tying rakhis to trees. Rakhi is an Indian festival for siblings where the sister ties an auspicious thread of love on her brother’s wrist, amidst great revelry and feasting. The latter, in turn, promises her protection throughout his life.

Read More

Related Articles

»Agartala to become India's first 'green city' By Teresa Rehman
Read More

»Green and gold, the colours of garbage
Read More

»Citizens for trees
Read More

News

Himachal Pradesh becomes first Indian state to sell carbon credits to the World Bank

Himachal Pradesh is the first Indian state to sell carbon credits under the UN-mandated Clean Development Mechanism to the World Bank from new forests to be developed largely on waste ground

Himachal Pradesh has become the first state in India to sign an agreement with the World Bank to secure carbon credits under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project in 11 watershed divisions under the Mid-Himalayan Watershed Development Project.

Under the agreement, the World Bank will buy carbon credits from new forests being developed on degraded land in Himachal Pradesh under a watershed management programme called the Reforestation Project-Improving Livelihood and Watersheds Project.

Read More

Related Articles

»SC denies plea for enhanced punishment for Bhopal gas tragedy accused
Read More

»World Bank-funded project runs into local resistance in Himachal
Read More

»Four dead, many injured in farmer protest in Noida
Read More

Statistics

Waste Characterization

Read More

Status of Municipal Solid Waste Management in Selected Metro Cities

Read More

Average Noise Levels in Various Metropolitan Cities

Read More

Statewise Production of Coal and Lignite

Read More

Bhopal Survivors Movement

'The Fire we ignited'

By Suroopa Mukherjee

Bhopal campaign for justice

How did the Bhopal campaign for justice come to be led by uneducated, cloistered women who had scarcely stepped out of their homes? Why are these women willing to stake both family and social priorities to create space for political engagement? This article looks at the gender dimension of the 25-year-old Bhopal survivors movement.

Gender has been a key concept in the Bhopal movement for justice. To begin with, women were the most vulnerable victims of the gas leak in 1984, both in terms of the breakup of the family unit, and problems of reproductive health and the social ostracism that followed.

Read More

Related Articles

»The Bhopal Movement as a school By Eurig Scandrett
Read More

»Environmentalism of the poor By Dharmesh Shah
Read More

»The demand for corporate accountability By Eurig Scandrett
Read More

Community forests of Orissa

What difference has the Forest Rights Act made?

By Subrat Kumar Sahu

With a strong community forest management network in place, one would think that forest-dependent communities in Orissa would be upbeat about the Forest Rights Act. But even as people’s movements begin to use the Act as a weapon in their struggle, most communities are confused about the scope of the Act and the processes to be used to file community claims to forests

Related Articles

»India's forests as carbon sinks By Subrat Kumar Sahu
Read More

»Destroyed by 'development' By Subrat Kumar Sahu
Read More

»'The protectors are thieves in disguise' By Subrat Kumar Sahu
Read More

 

Technology v/s Tradition

The journey from the private to the common

By Jyothi Krishnan

Does private ownership give the landowner the right to do as he pleases with land and water? It is only a new consciousness of the finiteness of natural resources that will lead to the appreciation that they exist in the common domain; that they can never be left to individual or private discretion, says Jyothi Krishnan

Related Articles

»Ponds are more than receptacles of water By Jyothi Krishnan
Read More

»The hierarchy of water ownership By Jyothi Krishnan
Read More

»Rich farmers retain water rights in Kerala By Jyothi Krishnan
Read More

Coastal commons

Eminent domain, absolute doubt: Crusade for Goa's comunidades

By Aarthi Sridhar

 GoaUnder Portuguese rule there were 223 comunidades, or independent village republics, in Goa. The people of each comunidade were absolute owners of its lands -- from hilltops to coasts. A people’s movement is now challenging the Indian state’s right to walk in and exercise eminent domain powers and jurisdiction over these lands

Related Articles

»Harbouring trouble: The impact of ports on commons By Aarthi Sridhar
Read More

»CRZ Notification 1991-2010: Anti-people? Anti-environment? Or anti-climax? By Aarthi Sridhar
Read More

»The unfairness of doing good By Aarthi Sridhar
Read More

The Paradox of environmentalism

Trapped into farming

By Michelle Chawla

Agriculture in Dahanu

The declaration of Dahanu as an ecologically fragile zone in 1991 has had repercussions on the orchard economy too. Farmers, already troubled by declining yields and globalisation, cannot convert their orchards to non-agricultural use. They feel they are trapped into farming by an environmentalism that is out of context

Related Articles

»The tribal's right By Michelle Chawla
Read More

»Making environmental mandates meaningful By Michelle Chawla
Read More

»People vs environmentalists By Michelle Chawla
Read More

Coastal nightmares

Poaching fish in Kutch Sea

By Anosh Malekar

Gujarat's 3.5 lakh fisher people are swept up in a gigantic brawl and   scrambling to surviveCaught between declining fish yields, the carving of the oceans into exclusive economic zones since the 1980s, frequent inquiries and detention by the Indian maritime security forces after the 26/11 terror attacks and the risk of capture by Pakistani maritime authorities, Gujarat’s 3.5 lakh marine fisher folk are fast losing their traditional livelihoods


Related Articles

»Coastal cities need to clean up their act By Rahul Goswami
Read More

»Sea change coming... By Richard Mahapatra
Read More

 

Fishing in troubled waters

Whose river is the Godavari?

By R Uma Maheshwari

 lakeWhy is there no mention of fisher communities in the relief & rehabilitation statistics of the Polavaram Dam? If tribal communities can seek land for land, and forest for forest, can the displaced fisherfolk of the Godavari seek a river for a river? Part 2 in our series on the fisherfolk being displaced by the Polavaram Dam

Related Articles

»Ecology of the river By R Uma Maheshwari
Read More

»Tourism adds to Godavari fishermen's woes By R Uma Maheshwari
Read More

»Short-changing inland fishworkers By R Uma Maheshwari
Read More

Despatches from Copenhagen

Bangladesh is ready with a climate change strategy

By Darryl D'Monte

Bangladesh fares better than India on many human development indicators. Now, knowing that they are nature’s laboratory for disaster, they’ve beaten us to a climate change action plant

Related Articles

»Media melee at Copenhagen By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

»Himalayan disasters By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

»Voices from the frontlines of climate change By Darryl D'Monte
Read More

Loktak: A dying lake

'There's nothing you didn't get from Loktak'

By Thingnam Anjulika Samom

 You would never come back from Loktak Lake empty-handed in times past, people say. Manipur’s freshwater lake provided fish, fuel, fodder, thatching material, medicinal plants and raw material for handicrafts. Today, both fish and vegetation have dwindled, and with it an important source of livelihood and security for thousands of local residents

Related Articles

»Scions of a changing lake By Thingnam Anjulika Samom
Read More

»From owners to 'occupiers' By Thingnam Anjulika Samom
Read More

»The trade-off between food security and 'development' By Thingnam Anjulika Samom
Read More

Northeast's fragile ecology

The journey from the private to the common

By Shailendra Yashwant

BhramaputraClimate change and upstream damming are causing the Brahmaputra to flood without rain, rhyme or reason.

The boat lurched dangerously. A sudden change in the water current slapped us around for a few minutes, and the river began rising rapidly, unexpectedly. There were no clouds in the sky, no signs of an impending storm, no radio reports of rains upcountry.

Related Articles

»Lost island By Shailendra Yashwant
Read More

»The wettest desert on earth By Shailendra Yashwant
Read More

»Kaziranga’s quandary By Shailendra Yashwant
Read More